Year 12 Media Studies:

90278: Demonstrate Understanding of messages and/or values, and representations within media texts..

Externally assessed trial. Credits 3:


You have one teaching period to complete this task. It is in three parts each should take 20 minutes to complete. You must answer ALL THREE questions to complete this paper.
Write your response on A4 refill paper. Clip this sheet to the top of your response.

Describe the representation of an identified group / culture within media texts Explain the representation of an identified group / culture within media texts Analyse the representation of an identified group / culture within media texts
Describe messages and / or values within media texts Explain messages and / or values within media texts Analyse messages and / or values within media texts
TASK
The Media texts you have studied: e.g.The representation of Males and / or Females in New Zealand Advertising (reference to alcohol & / or supermarket advertising. )


Question 1: a) Describe a group or culture you have studied. You must include at least TWO specific identifying features of the group or culture.
b) Describe and explain ONE way in which your chosen group or culture is represented in media texts. Support your answer with specific examples from at least TWO texts.
Question 2: Describe and explain TWO messages and / or values presented in media texts you have studied. For EACH message and / or value, support your answer with specific details from at least TWO media texts.
Question 3: Analyse the effect of representations, messages and values presented in media texts you have studied.
You could consider such things as:
• The society in which these texts were created
• Specific audience/s
• A specific group or culture
• The effect of changes in these representations/ message/ values
Support your answer with evidence from at least TWO media texts and / or other sources.

MODEL ANSWER: This gained a MERIT in the 2006 Exam


Question 1: a) Describe a group or culture you have studied. You must include at least TWO specific identifying features of the group or culture.
b) Describe and explain ONE way in which your chosen group or culture is represented in media texts. Support your answer with specific examples from at least TWO texts.

Response:
1a) The group studied is the representation of stereotypical New Zealand males in advertising. He is a rural character who loves being in the outdoors, drinking his beer and values male company over female company. (A)
1b) The stereotypical male is represented a loving beer. In N.Z. society at any outing or gathering you will find men drinking their beer, this is part of their laid back attitude toward life. Beer is important to N.Z. men and they will do anything for it. This is shown well in an advertisement for Tui beer, where it was not men who brewed Tui it was really gorgeous women. Two young men, who obviously love beer and are willing to do anything for their beer, dress up as women just to get inside the brewery to get their hands on their beer. Dressing up as women being the highest form of loosing any male pride they have, but they do it all for the beer.
Another good example is an advertisement for DB beer that shows “heaven” above the clouds as a pub full of men- the male ideal of perfect heaven – a lifetime of drinking beer. (A)
Question 2: Describe and explain TWO messages and / or values presented in media texts you have studied. For EACH message and / or value, support your answer with specific details from at least TWO media texts.
Response:
The first message is that stereotypical N.Z. men value male company above female company.
N.Z. men stick together and value being able to talk to their mates without any fuss being made as many women would. They are able to be their slow ironic selves around male company and not have to live up to idealistic expectations. This is shown in an advertisement for Speights beer where there are two stereotypical N.Z. men at their local pub dressed in their boots, swandris and akruba hats. They are slow of pace and when the young woman behind the bar offers the young guy two tickets to the upcoming dance, he only accepts them after she tells him there will be Speights on tap. Instead of giving the second ticket back to the girl, as she expected him to do, he gives the ticket to his mate showing that he would rather go with him and not to be tied down so he can drink as much Speights as he wants.
Another good example is the Mainland cheese advertisements. There are two older men who move at a very slow pace. The ad referes back to a “golden age” where everything was a lot slower and it was a very much rural life.
This is shown when the two men walk behind a wall. You see their top half and they are wearing suits, very unlike most N.Z. men, but as soon as they come to the end of the wall they are both wearing shorts and bare feet or gumboots. These two men are comfortable in being rural men together and in every mainland cheese advertisement the two men are seen, implying they are close and will be friends for ever.

The second message is that men love cars. They love speed and the ability to break the rules in them, the ability to fix them up, everything about cars men have claimed as their territory. A good example of this is in a Repco advertisement where the male is lounging around in a chair, beer in his hand, watching television when his girlfriend walks in - in her underwear to ask for his opinion. All he can focus on is the fact that Repco are having a sale of automotive parts. She gets annoyed at him for not appreciating her but in true Kiwi male style he just goes back to watching the TV Repco advertisement. He would rather watch an ad for car parts than watch his half naked girlfriend in her underwear. Those are his priorities.
Another example is an advertisement for Holden where a group of men are standing around talking about their cars. They sound as though they have sucked on helium balloons or that they have not yet gone through puberty, implying that because of the cars they drive they are not real men. When a large Holden ute drives up driven by a big, butch man, a complete opposite to the scrawny white boys with squeaky voices, who says, in a very deep voice, “Beautiful mate” implying that he is a real man and that anyone who doesn’t drive a Holden is not a real man. (M)
Question 3: Analyse the effect of representations, messages and values presented in media texts you have studied.
You could consider such things as:
• The society in which these texts were created
• Specific audience/s
• A specific group or culture
• The effect of changes in these representations/ message/ values
Support your answer with evidence from at least TWO media texts and / or other sources.

Response:
The views of a stereotypical N.Z. male can be traced back to a “golden age”, post World War II, when men were returning home to take care of their families and to work on the farm. Men were supposed to be able to fix things and be handy around the house with a tool belt which is where the term DIY or “Do it youyrself” originated from and which has stayed with N.Z. men since.
This mythic representation has followed N.Z. men through to today’s advertising. Such as the Mitre 10 advertisement wher a young guy has lost his girlfriend and his dog and thus feels there is no reason to go on living. But he goes to Mitre 10 where they have all any NZ male needs to do up his house. Which is what he does. He sticks to the stereotypical DIY male image and, as a result, feels better about himself then , adding to his happiness, a sexy young woman brings his dog back. This shows that DIY will make your life better, but by going to Mitre 10 fotr the equipment will make it better still.

Another good example is the famous Toyota “bugger” advertisement. This shows the other side of “DIY”. It shows the stereotype N.Z. men in their trucks on the farm, fixing fences, pulling tractors and tree stumps. But, instead of everything being fixed fine the laid back attitude gets the better of the men so that the “fix ups” end up being worse than they were in the first place. This makes the men say “Bugger” at their poor efforts. This is the more likely outcome for a N.Z. male attempt at DIY.
(M)